Antibiotic Resistance (for providers)

Antibiotic Resistance (for providers)


Antibiotics are an amazing class of
medication. They have saved countless lives, but we’ve overused them. It’s important to use antibiotics when we know that
we’re dealing with a bacterial infection. So for example strep throat. We know that
that’s caused by a particular kind of bacteria. Most the time when people are
sick they have a viral infection. And many people will think that they have a
bacterial infection and will ask for an antibiotic, but in fact that’s not the
appropriate treatment for that kind of infection. One of the biggest concerns we
have with prescribing antibiotics is causing something called antibiotic
resistance. And this comes about when we use an antibiotic to treat an infection,
or what we think is an infection. It kills off a number of bacteria, but then
there’s a certain number of bacteria that are left that have either some
inherent resistance already, or they create it. And now those bacteria are
left behind and are multiplying. And then it becomes much more difficult to treat
them with simple antibiotics going forward. I think all of us in health care
are all worried about creating antibiotic resistance. Because if we
can’t treat simple infections with simple antibiotics or even stronger
antibiotics because there’s this resistance that’s been created, we’re in
trouble. And a good example that would be multi drug-resistant TB, which we’re
seeing all over the world. So we have forms of a really serious infection that
we can no longer treat the way we once did and we’re running out of options. Antibiotic resistance is a huge problem because we’ve been far too easy with
prescribing antibiotics for too many conditions that did not require them. There’s been a huge amount of pressure from patients, and for good reason. They
want to be better. They want their children to feel better quicker. And
honestly it’s a lot easier to give somebody a prescription for an
antibiotic than it is to counsel them about all the other things we could or
should be doing to take care of an illness. So when we prescribe one we want
to make sure that we’re treating something that really requires an
antibiotic. And in Minnesota professionals in human health, animal
health and environmental health are all coming together. And we’re realizing that
it’s important to address all of this. Because we’re all in this together. And
if we take care of the earth and our animals and our people and are really
aware of antibiotic stewardship, we can really make a difference.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *