Antibiotic Resistance (Microbiology and Human Diseases)

Antibiotic Resistance (Microbiology and Human Diseases)


Antibiotic Resistance Interview In Progress Microbiology and Human Diseases (D Period) a tiny little living thing Well, it’s a single-celled organism found all over. They’re not always harmful, but they can cause illnesses. I think it’s a bacteria? Actually, they’re microbes that are smaller than bacteria and they cannot survive without a host cell therefore, they are not cellular. Since antibiotics have been around for so long, the bacteria are starting to learn how to fight them and so, basically bad pathogens are able to fight against antibiotics which is scary because there could be a superbug, that could take over, and kill us all. Wow, alright. That looks like a superbug. A superbug is a type of bacteria that has become resistant to antibiotics. Oh, fancy picture. I was just looking this up, because I’m very intellectually curious. And this website says that you can protect yourself from superbugs, by finishing your antibiotics so as to kill all the bacteria. They won’t be able to survive the drug, develop resistance to antibiotics and multiply, and you should also not take antibiotics if it’s not necessary. Wow, impressive. Thank you. Thanks. Thanks. I don’t know. Well, I can tell you that. Everyone is at risk. It occurs naturally but the overuse of antibiotics exacerbates the problem. In countries without standard treatment guidelines, antibiotics are often overprescribed by health workers and veterinarians and overused by the public. Many diseases such as tb (tuberculosis) that have been relatively easy to treat in the past are becoming harder to treat because of antibiotic resistance. We are heading to a post-antibiotic era when common diseases and infections can be deadly again. Thank you. *merry skipping* Because if drugs are antibiotic-resistant, then it means that we can’t treat diseases and we have to come up with new antibiotics to treat them which is like expensive and time-consuming. That’s right! Antibiotic resistance has spread around the world and it’s making some diseases such as meningitis and pneumonia more difficult to treat. You might need stronger, more expensive drugs, or, it might have to take them longer. You also might not get as well as quickly, or you could develop other health issues. when you’re not sick That’s right! But additionally, you shouldn’t take antibiotics to fight viral or fungal infections. Antibiotics specifically target bacterial infections, and won’t be effective against viral infections like the common flu, colds, or even Ebola. Inappropriate or excessive use of antibiotics also allows for an increase in antibiotic resistance. Only take antibiotics prescribed by your doctor, and never share your antibiotics. Through lots of adaptation and many generations of multiplying and stuff. Yes! And, bacteria can be naturally resistant to certain types of antibiotics. Bacteria may become resistant by genetic mutation, or by acquiring resistance from another bacterium. Genetic mutation is very rare and it enables the bacteria to produce chemicals that inactivate antibiotics. Bacteria can get antibiotic resistance genes from other bacteria by mating process that transfer genetic material. Viruses can also pass resistance between bacteria. Well, I mean it’s a huge issue, so I’m thinking probably millions are infected each year? and die, I think 23,000. Well, you’re actually not that off. Antibiotic resistance, and new resistance mechanisms are emerging at dangerous rates and they’re spreading globally. This threatens our ability to treat even common infections, and diseases we could earlier have treated. Now today, 2 million new cases occur each year, with at least 23,000 people dying each year. I do not. Well, the answer is multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, drug-resistant Tuberculosis, which is a leading cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia, MRSA, which is multidrug-resistant staph infection, and Pneumococcus. Think I’ve got some herbs in my garden that work pretty well. You can prevent antibiotic resistance by using antibiotics when prescribed by a certified health professional, and always following their advice when using antibiotics, as well as never sharing or using leftover antibiotics. And also, don’t ever skip doses and always finish your rounds. I have no idea. I dont know. I genui- Paul Farmer wrote the book Mountains Beyond Mountains, which I give to a lot of graduates from Hockaday the last 8 years I’ve probably given the book out 22 times for students who are interested. Paul Farmer started the clinics that are in Africa in the Congo I think is where it all started possibly or near Rwanda I’m trying to remember where the location was but he started clinics that helped serve people who weren’t being served. He kind of is like the reason Doctors Without Borders has taken flight and all of these programs since then I think have erupted because of his leadership. Okay, thank you! I’m such a good person to ask!

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