Antibiotic: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Antibiotic: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly


history was made when the first
antibiotic penicillin was discovered in the 1920s since then over 100
antibiotics have been discovered so what exactly does an antibiotic do these are a
few types of antibiotics and how they work beta-lactam kills bacteria
that are surrounded by cell walls by destroying them when too much pressure is
present in the cell the membrane burst killing the bacteria macrolides
prevent ribosomes which is the bacteria cells protein building machines to stop
working when a bacterium cannot produce protein it will die hence there are two
types of antibiotics one kill and the other stop bacteria from reproducing
antibiotic may harm friendly bacteria also known as probiotics with lesser probiotics in our body our body is more prone to infections side-effect of
consuming antibiotic include diarrhea or a mild stomach upset due to the
overuse of antibiotics some bacteria have become resistant to its effect
therefore new antibiotics need to be discovered as death may be the consequences

26 Replies to “Antibiotic: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly”

  1. WOW! GREAT VIDEO! NOW I JUST WANNA OVERDOSE ON ANTIBIOTICS!!!!!! WE LOVE ANTIBIOTICS! NICE ONE JANNAAAA NOW LETS DO ADV CANCER CA! :/

  2. After watching the video, I have a better understanding of the antibiotics’ mechanism.

    Bacteria are constantly remodelling their cell walls, simultaneously building and breaking down portions of cell wall as they grow and divide.
    B-Lactam antibiotics are bactericidal and act by inhibiting the formation of peptidoglycan cross-links in the bacterial cell wall, resulting in an increase of osmotic pressure. The build-up of peptidoglycan precursors triggers the activation of bacterial cell wall hydrolases and autolysins which further digest the cell’s peptidoglycans. The penicillin increases their potency, allowing them to penetrate the entire depth of the cell wall. Resulting DD-transpeptidase cannot catalyse these cross-links and an imbalance between cell wall production and degradation develop.

    In times to come, the antibiotics we rely on today may one day become obsolete.

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