Arizona Illustrated Episode 606

Arizona Illustrated Episode 606


(calm guitar music) – [Tom] This week on Arizona Illustrated, looking to the heavens on Mount Lemmon. – 80% of the world’s population can’t see the Milky Way
anymore, and many people come up and it is the first
time they’ve seen that. – [Tom] Healthy remedies, new and old. – It’s kind of like
setting up two friends, you know, you’re like well these plants have these virtues and these strengths, and this person is needing
or yearning for these aspects in their life, so I want them to meet. – [Tom] A date with Douglas. – We have family over there,
we have family over here, you know, it isn’t like it’s them and us, it’s still we are we. – [Tom] And from far afield, Feverfew. (calm guitar music) – Welcome to Arizona
Illustrated, I’m Tom McNamara. Southern Arizona’s
known for its dark skies and mountaintop observatories, allowing amateur stargazers and professional astronomers alike to set their eyes on planets and galaxies millions of miles away. We went to the Mount Lemmon observatory to see for ourselves. – I think for a lot of people, from the time you’re young, you look up and you see the stars, and
you can sort of develop this sense of wonder,
and what is out there, what could be out there, and
what those possibilities are, and it makes you feel very big, and simultaneously very, very small. (ethereal music) I’m Tracie Beuden, I’m an
instructional specialist for the Mount Lemmon SkyCenter. – We run nightly public
astronomy programs, we call them SkyNights, five days a week, and the goal is to bring people up, and give them the sense
that science matters. You are literally at the
summit, the highest point in the Catalina Mountains, and this site originally
was a military installation during the Cold War. It was developed in the late 1950’s. Often, people think that astronomy
is too big or too amazing or that there’s some level of
math that they have to have to be able to understand and
appreciate the night sky. And what we work to do in our programs is to take that wonder and
amazement that they come in with and help them understand science, and that through that science
they can demand an answer and that it makes the night sky, the objects they’re
looking at in the telescope even more amazing and wonderful. – [Tracie] So we’re
gonna use our binoculars, and we’re gonna focus on that little blip. What I want you to do
is take your binoculars and close your right
eye, we’re gonna focus on that little blip with our left eye. And once you get into focus, you can see that little blip is actually a telescope. That’s the 4-meter Telescope. I actually joke that I need this job to fund my outreach habit. Astronomy is a very accessible subject. It’s an observational science, and one can go out and see the stars, and you know, make notes,
and see what changes and what doesn’t. – Often someone looks at a small galaxy, and it’s a fuzzy gray
thing in the eyepiece. But when they learn what
it is they’re looking at and that they begin to
understand the distance to that galaxy, or that
the brighter center tells them something, or
that there’s a lane of dust in the spiral arm, the
meaning that they can make through that understanding
is almost intangible. And we never know when they leave, where they take that sense
of inquiry and excitement. – I started working at the
SkyCenter about five years ago. I’ve just always loved astronomy. I mean science and space is just awesome. I mean what kid does not
wanna become an astronaut until you realize how
terrifying space is? (laughs) I mean it’s a vacuum
and near absolute zero, and just think the movie
Gravity, just real. And so you decide to look at it from afar instead of actually going to it. You know, I remember
when I was a little kid getting a little telescope
and trying to find things and not being able to,
and getting into college, you know, taking astronomy
class, falling in love with it, getting a new telescope,
and actually being able to see a few things and being like, this is what I wanna do. – [Alan] Southern Arizona,
we’re very lucky to have access to the night sky, where
we can see many stars, where we can see the Milky Way. 80% of the world’s population can’t see the Milky Way anymore, and many people come up,
and it is the first time they’ve seen that, and
it’s a visceral experience, and not to sound too mystical, but it is something that binds us across time and cultures. – I love sharing my passion
for the night sky with others. I love to see people’s
faces when they see Saturn for the first time in a
telescope, or Jupiter, and just to inspire that awe in people, the same awe that I feel when
I look up at the night sky. – Isaac, go ahead and look through, tell me what we’re looking at. – I see a thingy with two (mumbles) – It looks kind of like a ball with ears? That’s exactly how Galileo described it. We are looking at Saturn. The absolute favorite
part of my job, I think, would be being able to
show something to someone that they have heard
about, or they’ve been always interested in seeing, that they have never
been able to see before. One instance was we actually had a PhD student here at the SkyCenter. He had been studying white dwarf stars, basically the dead cores of stars, for the last four or five years. He had used data from various telescopes including Hubble, but he
had never actually seen a white dwarf through a
telescope before visually. And so I was able to actually do that, and his excitement, being
able to see something that he’d been researching for so many years was just awesome. Okay, are we ready to move the telescope? Hold on, we’re ready? Okay, now you’re gonna
click that button right here that says go to, and then
look at the telescope. Watch it. – My name is Isaac Ides Federico Teneo. My, I’m the, my grade is first grade. I’m six years old. I’ve been moving this big
giant telescope right here, and I got it to go see
the moon, the sunset, Jupiter, the other place, yeah the spinny thing I’ve heard of. – Move this over down here. – And I have to feed my cat. My cats are gonna be so frustrated. When I grow up I wanna be a scientist. I wanna build stuff, like Tony Stark, who sacrificed his self. – I’m sorry, I’m sending a signal, okay? Let’s see, dot dot dot dash dash dash. So in about 22 thousand years, they might respond. I would be interested
in going up to space. Definitely not like going
to like Mars or something. Little too far, a little
bit long of a commute. – I would actually love to be in space, yeah I would not turn
down a ticket. (laughs) One way, both ways, I’m good. (gentle music) – We humans, you know, we’ve been on this planet
for a good, long while. And we know the earth pretty well, but astronomy is the study
of literally everything else. – As humans we evolved with natural cycles of light and dark. The stars were how we found our way across land and water scapes, and the stars are where the gods lived, where our culture lived, and
how stories were passed down, and when I look up at the night sky I feel really small, but I also feel connected to something huge
and something infinite, and I think that we’re really missing that in our society today, that
we have so many boundaries and countries and
divisions, and differences, and when you look up at the night sky and see that beauty, you realize that we’re just humans on spaceship earth as we’re, you know, hurdling through space at really, really breakneck speeds, and the boundaries that we’ve created for ourselves here, they kind of melt away when you look up and realize that we’re all just humans in it together. – Douglas, Arizona, the
southeastern corner of the state was built as a smelter town last century to serve the copper
mines in nearby Bisbee. But since the smelter closed in the ’80’s, the border community’s
economy has been struggling. Well, recently the town
launched a pilot program to promote tourism. This is a date with Douglas. (energetic music) – I like to call myself the
old cheerleader of Douglas. Gracias. Basically I’m a volunteer, trying to point out to people that we have an amazing
community, we really do. When I do a tour, I like
to show people who we are. I like to show them the Gadsden Hotel, ’cause you look at it from the outside, and you’re like, eh, so? Then you walk in and the magic happens. (jazz music) – It was really established
because of the copper industry, you know, and this was the place to be, and we just really wanna
recreate that again for everyone. We had heard that they
were gonna close the hotel. The owner had passed away,
couldn’t find a buyer, and the rumors around town were that they were really gonna close it. This truly is a labor of love. And I will tell you, it
is worth every day of it. We decided to take a leap of faith and make an offer on the building, and they accepted it,
and here we are. (laughs) (gentle music) – Church square, the four churches that are on this block over here in front of us, you
have the Baptist Church, you’ve got the Presbyterian Church, the Episcopalian Church,
and the Methodist Church, all on one block. It was planned that way. When they were designing the city, when they were designing
Douglas, that was planned. Douglas has extremely wide streets. The criteria was 20 mules. 20 mules had to be able
to make a turn in Douglas, so that’s how wide the street had to be, and I thought okay, you know. (laughs) So there’s a lot of little quirky things that are kind of fun and
just amazing about Douglas. (playful music) There’s a new art group coming in, and there’s all kinds
of ways to express art. – Art Car World is a vision of a gentleman named Harrod Blank. He’s a filmmaker, and his passion has been folk art, and in
this case, automotive art. (playful music) Harrod had a long relationship
with friends from Bisbee, and in terms of choosing
Douglas as a place to come, folks had recommended it,
because it had several buildings which he could afford to purchase. So it really was a real estate
issue rather than any other. – El Chapo’s stall, yeah, people are like, when that was discovered, I
remember bein’ in Douglas, and all of a sudden it was
helicopters everywhere, you know, and it was like
this invasion of helicopters, but it was the media. – You’re inside the warehouse
that housed the exit of Chapo Guzman’s first drug tunnel. And it’s significant, because
he made lots of tunnels, and this is his first one. And he started this in ’89, and it was found, busted
by the DA, May of 1990. This grate that’s down to my right here on the ground is where
it came up on the US side and it started in Agua Prieta, 330 feet south of here. There the access to the
tunnel was underneath a pool table that was on hydraulic lifts. To me it was a bench mark, because the Douglas
smelter closed in 1987, that was what provided about
a 10 million dollar payroll and 345 jobs here. When that closed, it left this horrendous vacuum,
obviously, in here. Well, Chapo came to town in late ’89, and that all changed. It was such an influx of money, it just changed Agua Prieta forever. I saw documents that indicated estimates, DA estimates, they estimate
it was over 70 tons of cocaine came through this
hole right next to me here. (birds chirping) – So it’s an intriguing
time of Douglas’ history, but it doesn’t say who we are, it’s just a piece of it,
it doesn’t define us. It’s just a piece of our history. So yeah, we can either
make lemonade out of it, or keep it as a lemon. When you think about it,
like my family has roots that came all the way from 1906. That’s my dad’s side of the family. 1906 they arrived. We’re not even a state. My mother’s side of the
family came in 1917. We have roots that go way back. We have family over there,
we have family over here. You know, it isn’t like all of a sudden it’s them and us, it’s still
we are we, we’re we’s here. This was done by the Memorial Committee, and they did it all on their own. The Memorial Park has
the names of everybody who was killed in action. I volunteer because I believe strongly that you have to give
back to your community, and I don’t do anything,
I don’t give anything of my time unless I have passion. It was just like a YMCA across the nation. – I have been very, very
supportive, not only of Ginny, Ginny Jordan, because
she’s a great ambassador of our community, but
I believe that tourism is one of the major things
that Douglas has to offer. We have a lot, it’s just that sometimes we don’t open up our eyes and our ears to see what’s going on. – You know, people will tell me, “Oh, Douglas is so boring.” And I go God, I’d give a day to be bored. I’ve never been bored, you know, I just don’t know what
it’s like to be bored. – [Interviewer] How long
are you gonna be doing this? – [Ginny] ‘Til I get a new
residence on 3rd Street. You know what 3rd Street is? That’s where the cemetery is. (playful music) – The Discover Douglas tours are currently scheduled the second and fourth
Saturdays of the month. For more information, visit
discoverdouglasavenue.com. Modern medicine has made many life saving and life extending advancements, but for a growing number of people, a more natural and organic
approach to health remedies, therapies, and cures is being embraced, some of which are centuries old. (calm music) – We do it without even noticing it. There’s some kind of innate knowing that it improves the quality of our lives to be around plants. (calm music) St. John’s wort and chamomile
were these two herbs that allowed me to remember
that like life, it still happens and they just brought in this positivity that I felt like I was really without. – I had really incredible
memories of my Great Grandma Lupe coming over to my house in Phoenix when I was a really young kid and kind of boiling herbs on the stove. We had just yerba buena
growing wild in our back yard, and she saw it and
recognized it as something that was edible, that we could drink, and even though I must
have been really young, that really stuck with me for some reason. I’m Carla Vargas-Frank, I’m an herbalist, I
have a private practice here in Tucson, and I also do
education, herbal education. Herbalism is using plant material from everything from food
to ritual to medicine. It can be vibrational, it
can be more allopathic, but I think just kind of
using the natural world as a way to balance and heal oneself. Healing resource for the community. So when I sit down with a client it’s gonna take at least two hours. I wanna look at their, you
know, their history of health, I wanna look at their family’s health, I also wanna hear about the experiences that they’ve had growing up, whether or not they’ve come
to me for a physical issue or a mental issue, that may have affected how they live in the world. And so then when I get
that initial knowledge from that person, I can sort
of kind of piece together sort of like a team of herbs that I think would be helpful
to that person in this time. And it’s kind of like setting
up two friends, you know, you’re like, well these
plants have these virtues and these strengths, and
this person is needing or yearning for these aspects
in their life to bring balance so I want them to meet. Herbal medicine and the
healing philosophies that come out of a lot
of these traditions, we look at people as a whole, and I think that people are
really yearning for that. – I’ve had experiences where
I’ve gone to a practitioner, a Western doctor, and
instead of them asking me what I’m dealing with or
what I’m going through, or how I’d like to deal
with what I’m going through, they would tell me, and so many times those
things didn’t work. It started with mental health for sure, because when I was living in
Seattle I struggled a lot. I felt very lost at that time, I felt very depressed and very lethargic. I had no health insurance. I started to think about
where my resources were and what I felt like I could obtain, and it was a lot of herbs
like St. John’s wort and chamomile, and things like that, and they just brought in this
kind of springtime feeling of kind of growing and being like, you know I’m capable
again of leaving my house and I feel like I want to do these things. I think there may be a new awareness of connecting back to the earth and back to our ancestral traditions, especially among, I think
women and queer folks, and non binary people. I think we live in a world
where we feel really secluded and sometimes ostracized. – I think that people
are feeling disempowered by being looked at sort of in pieces, and so I think the
similarity between a lot of these traditions, no
matter where they come from is that we’re looking for the root. We’re digging for where it started, and it’s impossible, really, I think, to find that root without, you know, looking at all of the
things and the situations and the environments that
have brought us to this point. This is something that people can afford, they can access, there are
less kind of gatekeepers in terms of at least
looking towards solutions, and this is a way that people can take their health
into their own hands. – [Tom] And now from
our far afield series, we bring you Feverfew in Tucson. ♪ I’m not here to see you smile ♪ ♪ I’m not here for your sorrows to heal ♪ ♪ I’m not here to mend your broken parts ♪ ♪ I’m just broken but you know that ♪ ♪ I’m not here to fill
your lonely nights ♪ ♪ I’m not here to take away your delight ♪ ♪ I’m not here to mend your broken parts ♪ ♪ I’m just as broken but you know that ♪ (distorted rock and roll music) ♪ I can’t be what you need ♪ ♪ Be what you need ♪ ♪ Yeah yeah ♪ ♪ I can’t leave you dead on the floor ♪ (distorted rock and roll music) ♪ Can we can we gently hang out ♪ ♪ Can we can we gently pretend ♪ ♪ And can we gently spend
the night together ♪ ♪ And can we gently be friends ♪ (distorted rock and roll music) (distorted singing) ♪ I mess everything up ♪ (distorted rock and roll music) ♪ I’m not here to be romantic ♪ ♪ I’m not here to be romantic ♪ ♪ I’m not here to mend your broken heart ♪ ♪ I’m just as broken but you know that ♪ ♪ I’m not here to fill your broken heart ♪ ♪ I’m not here to mend your broken parts ♪ ♪ I’m just as broken but you know that ♪ ♪ Just as broken ♪ ♪ Just as broken ♪ ♪ Just as broken ♪ ♪ Just as broken ♪ ♪ But you know that ♪ (distorted rock and roll music) (gentle music) – Thank you for joining us here on Arizona Illustrated. I’m Tom McNamara, see you next week. (gentle music)

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