Get Smart About Antibiotics: For Patients and Parents

Get Smart About Antibiotics: For Patients and Parents


[Armando] Hi My name
is Armando Nahum. And, I know a lot about
antibiotic resistance. I know because in 2006,
my son Joshua died from an antibiotic-resistant
infection he caught from receiving medical care
during a hospital stay. He was only 27. So this will never happen
to you or your family, there are some important
things you should know about antibiotics. Please watch this short,
informative video that follows on how you can help stop
antibiotic resistance in its tracks. [Katherine] Antibiotic
resistance is one of the world’s most pressing
public health problems; because of it, illnesses
that were once treatable with antibiotics are resulting
in dangerous infections, and prolonging suffering for
both children and adults. Taking antibiotics
increases your risk of getting an
antibiotic-resistant infection later. Antibiotics are not effective
against viral infections like the common cold, flu,
most sore throats, bronchitis, and many sinus and
ear infections. So NEVER insist that your
clinician prescribe them for these conditions because
they may cause more harm than good. It’s estimated that for those
patients who visit a clinic in the United States, about half of antibiotics prescribed
are unnecessary or the wrong antibiotic. Taking antibiotics can also
give harmful side effects. 1 out of 5 emergency
department visits are due to these side effects, such as
allergic reactions and diarrhea. Here is what you can do to help
prevent antibiotic resistance and stay safe from
harmful side effects: Tell your healthcare
professional you are concerned about antibiotic resistance. Ask your healthcare professional
if there are steps you can take to feel better and get
relief from symptoms of colds and bronchitis without
using antibiotics. Ask what vaccines they
can recommended for you and your family to prevent
infections so you won’t get sick and need an antibiotic. Remember, never take an
antibiotic for viral infections like a cold or the flu. Take the prescribed
antibiotic exactly as your healthcare
professional tells you. And, unless your healthcare
professional tells you to do so, never skip doses or stop taking
an antibiotic early. Discard any leftover medication and never save antibiotics. Don’t take antibiotics
prescribed for someone else or give antibiotics prescribed
to you to someone else. While we never want
to use antibiotics when they aren’t necessary,
it is also important to react quickly if an
infection, like a surgical wound or skin infection, isn’t getting
better or is getting worse. For more information on the latest clinical
practice guidelines for common infections,
visit www.cdc.gov/getsmart. [Armando] Please, remember that antibiotics are
a medical miracle and when used properly they
can save thousands of lives, but when used improperly
they are a threat to us all. I hope this short video
will help to keep you and your family safe and well.

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