Harvesting Garlic Mustard | Plus Making Garlic Mustard Pesto

Harvesting Garlic Mustard | Plus Making Garlic Mustard Pesto


harvesting garlic mustard plus making garlic mustard pesto this plant is at the top of my list of
wild edibles for three good reasons first off its a great nutrient rich food
and garlic mustard is also a highly invasive species so anyone will be very
happy and accommodating if you want to harvest it on their land the third
reason I love this plant so much is that it tastes amazing if you love garlic
that is it’s a fairly strong flavor to it but I happen to love it so where and
how do we find it it grows in most temperate areas around
the planet so for those in tropical areas near the equator or in Arctic
regions it’ll be harder to find the garlic mustard grows in shaded areas
that have been somehow disturbed meaning historically they were cleared it will
happily move in to take over as the new ground cover the plant will produce many
seeds for next year’s growth that will take up residence anywhere they find a
bit of available soil once they do they start to displace many other wonderful
wild native plants that’s less diversity for us and for all the other critters
and insects you end up with a garlic mustard mess the upside is you can
harvest to your heart’s content the more the better collect the leaves collect
the roots share with everyone you know once you learn about the plants virtues
you’ll wish you’d known about it sooner garlic mustard is a biennial that means
that the plant grows for two years only the first year the plant produces a
rosette of leaves that look like this that leaves are kidney shaped with these
scalloped edges the plant flowers the second year sets seed and then dies back
the flowering stalk grows about knee height you can see the white flower has
four petals in the shape of an X to be sure you have the right plant simply
crush the leaves and check for the garlic aroma it’ll be pretty obvious
this plant is part of the mustard family of plants so expect a slight kick in the
flavor it absolutely tastes like garlic I think it’s a bit more like a mild
tasting garlic for some people it’s fairly strong some
will prefer to use the stem since they tend to have a more mild flavor but I
prefer to use the leaves you can make the harvest most efficient by just
harvesting the whole above the ground portion of the plant note the plants
will become stronger in flavor and have a bit more bitter as they grow more
mature throughout the season for those of us that make a lot of pesto with our
greens this is the ultimate pesto herb you don’t even need to add garlic since
the garlic mustard provides that flavor it’s truly a great tasting plant for the
pesto all you need is four cups of garlic mustard 1/2 a cup of olive oil
1/4 cup of pine nuts and salt to taste simply put all of the ingredients into a
food processor and blend and it’s ready to go this pesto can be used on pasta
vegetables fish or as a topping for crackers or even crustinis you can also
use the leaves and stems if you prefer in all different kinds of other dishes
such as sandwiches wraps use your imagination any way that you might use arugula for an example it has sort of that similar kick of a flavor to it
it’s actually in the same mustard family as arugula the leaves are a good source
of vitamins A and C as well as a number of minerals that are commonly found in
other wild food greens although they are in a higher quantity in the garlic
mustard these include potassium calcium
magnesium selenium copper iron and manganese it’s also a great source of
fiber the root is equally a great edible although it doesn’t get as much
attention which is unfortunate if you harvest the entire plant you are
actually removing the garlic mustard out of the environment and therefore
preventing it from going to seed and continuing to spread you just simply
pull up the entire plant with the root to get even more benefit from the
harvest the roots make a great substitute for
any recipe calling for horseradish simply just grind up the root again in a
food processor and use it in any recipe that would call for horseradish for my
free herbalism mini course go to herbalismcourses.com
you’ll get quick access to my favorite herbal remedies for cold and flu first
aid herbs for energy and natural medicine found right in your own kitchen
look forward to seeing you there

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