Know How Antibiotics Are Used In Food – The Balancing Act

Know How Antibiotics Are Used In Food – The Balancing Act


(music). Common Ground is a grass roots
movement fostering conversation among women, from small towns to
big cities. It’s about farm women engaging
with consumers everywhere. Enlightening us about our food,
and food sources. America is not only a producer
of the tastiest, but healthiest and safest food in the world.
From healthy vegetables to healthy beef.
US Agriculture remains number one.
With us today, Kelsey Pope, a multitalented woman, is here to
share the latest common ground from down on the farm and the
ranch. Kelsey, welcome.
We’re so glad to have you on the show.
Thank you. You do it all.
Youre a mom, you’re a rancher, you’re a blogger.
I want to know how you got into ranching, and also know how
you’re latest passion is really blogging.
Tell me about those two things. I’m a fourth generation family
rancher. My family raises red angus
cattle on the plains of Eastern Colorado.
I ranch with my parents and husband and my son, who is
hopefully the fifth generation. Wow.
I started my blog actually when I was in college.
My college roommate was a city girl and knew nothing about
agriculture and she was really interested, though, and wanted
to know a lot more. So, I thought if she was really
interested, there was probably a lot of other people who are too.
So, I started my blog, Ag on the Forefront, simply
answering her questions, and it’s really grown to be my
passion, just talking about agricultural issues, as well as
just life on the ranch. You’re a rancher, but
you’re also a volunteer for Common
Ground. Tell me a little bit about that
organization. Common ground is a great
organization. It allows for conversations for
women from farms to cities, about where our food comes from.
The National Corn Growers Association, United Soybean
Board, and their state affiliates all started Common
Ground to give farm women and ranch women the opportunity to
talk to our consumers about how we raise food.
We’re volunteer farm women from all across the country.
We represent all facets of agriculture and we just want to
be a resource because we’re moms.
We’re putting food on the table just like everyone else,
and so we want to just be a resource to consumers, helping
them answer questions. We know that there are things
about raising food, and labels on food that they have
questions, and we don’t want them to have fear in their food.
And I love your slogan; You don’t have to fear your food.
Yes, that’s right. Now, as a rancher, I want you to
shed some light, for me and for our viewers, about the use of
antibiotics in cattle and what are the health benefits of that?
Right, so on our ranch we have a herd health program and that
starts with vaccines to prevent disease, but then just like we
get sick, animals can get sick too.
So, sometimes it’s necessary to treat them.
We’ll give them an antibiotic for an injury, or if they’re
sick from a bacterial infection and this is the most common
reason why any rancher would use antibiotics.
We work closely with our veterinarian.
We find out what’s wrong with the animal, and we follow the
label and dosing instruction on that antibiotic, which are
approved by the FDA. There are other forms of
antibiotics that help animals to grow more efficiently, but the
whole reason that we as ranchers use antibiotics, is just to give
us a healthy animal, because we want to provide our consumers
with healthy, safe and nutritious beef.
Sure. And so what role does the FDA
play in the use of antibiotics? The FDA regulates the
approval and use of all antibiotics in food animals.
There is a stringent process. It’s the same testing for
human medicine as it is for animal medicine.
Each antibiotic has a withdrawal time, and that means from when
they are given the antibiotic, until it’s out of their
system, and the maximum time is 28 days, so the FDA assures us
that our meat is safe, that there’s going to be no
antibiotic residue. That’s really important to me
as a rancher. Of course.
Because I want to continue to earn the trust and respect, not
only of our meat buyers, but also our consumers, all of us
who we’re providing safe, nutritious beef for.
I hear you. Where does this misconception
come from, that ranchers or farmers are pumping their cow
with antibiotics? So, as a rancher, I take great
pride in raising our animals, and if we don’t take care of
our animals, they’re not going to take care of us, so our
family’s ranch is our business, our livelihood, and
antibiotics can be expensive, so we’re going to do everything
possible to make sure that animal is healthy, but never are
we going to give them more than they need, because it simply
isn’t a good business practice.
Healthy animals are the basis of a healthy food supply and it’s
my commitment to provide top-notch quality meat and I
want to continue to do that with top-notch animal care.
And how can we keep our food safe if, say…
some bacteria is resistant to the antibiotics.
So I know this is an issue that some consumers are concerned
about, but there has been no conclusive evidence showing that
antibiotic resistant bacteria comes from the meat that we eat.
There are occasional cases of food-borne bacteria, and that
can be killed by being cooked and handled properly.
So, if we’re all making sure to cook our food thoroughly using a
meat thermometer, keeping our cooked and raw food separate so
that the bacteria doesn’t transfer, and then also getting
our fresh food and chilled food in the fridge as soon as
possible, really is our key to food safety.
Well, Kelsey, thank you so much for stopping by and debunking
some of those misconceptions that are out there.
Where can our viewers go to find out more about Common Ground?
They can go to FindOurCommonGround.com or to my
blog AgOnTheForefront.com Okay, great!
Thanks for stopping by. Great information.
Thank you. And if you’d like additional
information on today’s food topic, we invite you to visit us
on TheBalancingAct.com or share your thoughts, ideas, or
concerns at Facebook.com/TheBalancingActFans
(music).

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