The protective power of vaccines against diarrhea

The protective power of vaccines against diarrhea


[MUSIC PLAYING] DR. RICHARD WALKER: There
are a number of pathogens, both bacterial and viral,
that cause enteric diseases, and vaccines against
these different pathogens can have a significant
impact on reducing diarrhea. DR. RUBHANA RAQIB: Icddr,b is
mainly a hospital for diarrheal diseases. So we see a lot of patients. Icddr,b could actually
identify the microorganisms– the rotavirus, or cholera, or
Shigella– or ETEC diarrhea. DR. ADITI ROY: For the children,
they want to taste everything. So they grab things
from the ground and enter into the mouth. This is one of the causes. DR. RUBHANA RAQIB: When
children have repeated episodes of diarrhea, they start losing
much of the micronutrients from their body. DR. GAGANDEEP KANG: The
child is sick for three days, but the gut is actually
getting damaged, which can lead to
affects on nutrition, can lead to effects
on immune response. Which just means
that the consequences of an acute infection can
last much longer than people have realized. DR. LOU BOURGEOIS: We’re
seeing an alarming increase in the level of
multi-antibiotic resistance, because many of the agents
are resistant to a lot of the commonly used drugs. DR. RICHARD WALKER: Prevention
is much better than treatment. DR. RUBHANA RAQIB: This
Center has done the work for doing vaccine
trials for many decades. And finally, based on this
research and findings, it has introduced the
rotavirus vaccine into the EPI [expanded program on immunization]. DR. LOU BOURGEOIS:
Rotavirus vaccine has had a tremendous
impact on saving lives. DR. RICHARD WALKER: Children
in less developed countries respond differently to vaccines
than people in, like, North America or Europe. DR. LOU BOURGEOIS: How
they ultimately will work will really have to be looked
at the target population. DR. RICHARD WALKER:
Unfortunately, we don’t have as many
vaccines as we need. DR. RUBHANA RAQIB: We don’t
have a licensed vaccine against ETEC and Shigella. So it is important to test this. DR. RICHARD WALKER: That’s
why a number of groups, like our group, is working
to develop those vaccines, so that they can be used in
conjunction with other means, to reduce diarrheal diseases. DR. RUBHANA RAQIB: If
you have the vaccine, it will eventually
help to eradicate the disease from the community. Just like we have seen for
smallpox, or even polio. My hope is the EPI vaccines,
newer vaccines coming into the pipeline, we’ll have
healthy children, and then healthy adults,
who will contribute to the growth of the
country, and a bright future for Bangladesh. [MUSIC PLAYING]

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