Using VR to transform physical therapy

Using VR to transform physical therapy


Ready to do that again? Yep. Let’s do it. Virtual reality video games of all sorts are being used in physical therapy for kids and for adults and so what we want to understand is, is there some advantage of practice in a virtual environment and if so, what are those advantages? What is it about the virtual reality setting that might actually enhance learning as compared to when you practice skills in a physical environment. I mean the implications of virtual reality are across a wide variety of rehabilitation contexts. I specifically focus on motor and balance training, so people who might have had a stroke or an acquired brain injury or children with cerebral palsy. Cerebral palsy is a group of movement disorders that occur at birth and they result in problems with movement and posture balance, coordination, and speech. What we don’t know enough of is, when you learn a skill in a virtual environment, to what extent does that actually help you get better at that skill in real life? That’s what we do in rehab, right? Anything that we do, we want the person not just to be better while they’re with us, while our hands are on them, but we want them to be able to take those improvements and transfer that back into their real life setting. So when Mattea turns nine, I’m hiring her. What are the child labor laws in this state? Ten? Is that is that the minimum age that you can work in this state? Getting my fancy gear on. Although all of our studies ultimately aim to improve rehabilitation for kids with cerebral palsy and other movement disorders, we really need to make sure that first of all that we test all of our experimental paradigms and our tasks with typically developing children first, to make sure that they’re working and that they’re measuring what we want to measure and it’s also really important to have, kind of, baseline performance for typically developing kids so we can see to what extent the performance and the learning of kids with cerebral palsy differs from their typically developing peers. What we wanted to do with that task where she was sitting first of all in a two dimensional virtual environment, where she saw the task in front of her on a screen, then in the three-dimensional virtual environment, where she was totally immersed and she was wearing the head-mounted display, and then finally in the real world task, we wanted to see which of those conditions might actually enhance learning the task to a greater extent. There are certainly clinicians who really feel that real-life interaction absolutely has more benefits than practice in a virtual environment and I totally agree. What I think is that these games can provide a very useful adjunct that can potentially offer some extra benefits and if you integrate them into your interventions in combination with the things that you’re doing with practice in the real world, with getting out there and having people do skills in different environments, I think that’s where you can offer a really beneficial advantage. Go, go, go, go, nice. Okay. Oh no! They caught you.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *